Adult learning disability needs assessments

1.How many working-age adults (aged 18-64) with a learning disability were refused an assessment for adult social care in:
a. 2018/19
b. 2017/18
c. 2016/17
d. 2015/16
e. 2014/15

Financial Year No of unique clients
2014- 2015 143
2015 – 2016 167
2016 – 2017 206
2017 – 2018 192
2018 – 2019 105
Total 813 (672 unique across whole date range) 

We do not hold information on individuals who do get assessed. We do record data about individuals who are assessed as not requiring statutory services provided by the local authority – see below – and on individuals who had an assessment halted for a variety of reasons, although the reasons themselves are not recorded.
Data has been filtered to identify those clients who are aged 18-64 years old where the primary support reason is learning disability, where their assessment was ended within the financial year and the outcome was Abandoned, or No Eligible Needs.

2. In 2018/19, from the date of their first request for an initial assessment for adult social care, or from the date when the LA first became aware that an assessment was required, how many working-age adults (aged 18-64) with a learning disability had to wait:
a. Over 6 weeks for an assessment to be completed
b. Over 12 weeks for an assessment to be completed
c. Over 24 weeks for an assessment to be completed
d. Please also provide answers to 2(a) to 2(c) for the following years:
i. 2017/18
ii. 2016/17
iii. 2015/16
iv. 2014/15

Financial Year Waiting time  = 6 weeks 6 Р11 weeks 12 Р23 weeks >24 weeks Total of which unique in Financial Year
2014 – 2015 1,360 190 90 41 1,681 1552
2015 – 2016 978 244 141 43 1,406 1237
2016 – 2017 818 315 331 203 1,667 1390
2017 – 2018 897 356 306 243 1,802 1574
2018 – 2019 679 242 155 109 1,185 1061
Totals 4,732 1,347 1,023 639 7,741
of which unique across whole date range 2476 1061 851 551 2913

This has been filtered for those clients who are aged 18-64 years old with an LD primary support reason. We have then calculated the difference between the start and end of the assessment.

3. In 2018/19, from the date of their first request for an initial assessment for adult social care, or from the date when the LA first became aware that an assessment was required, how many working-age adults (aged 18-64) had to wait:
a. Over 6 weeks for an assessment to be completed
b. Over 12 weeks for an assessment to be completed
c. Over 24 weeks for an assessment to be completed
d. Please also provide answers to 3(a) to 3(c) for the following years:
i. 2017/18
ii. 2016/17
iii. 2015/16
iv. 2014/15

Financial Year <6 weeks 6 – 11 weeks 12 – 23 weeks >24 weeks Total of which unique in financial year
2014 – 2015 2,720 763 381 120 3,984 3497
2015 – 2016 2,472 904 529 151 4,056 3432
2016- 2017 2,323 881 483 277 3,694 3425
2017 – 2018 2,237 677 347 230 3,491 3121
2018 – 2019 1,204 297 169 103 1,773 1618
Total 1o,956 3,522 1,909 881 17,268
Of which unique across whole date range 6986 2882 1600 769 8924

This has been filtered for those clients who are aged 18-64 years old without an LD primary support reason. We have then calculated the difference between the start and end of the assessment

4. How many working-age adults (aged 18-64) with a learning disability had an assessment for adult social care which identified eligible needs in the following years?
a. 2018/19
b. 2017/18
c. 2016/17
d. 2015/16
e. 2014/15

Financial Year Number of unique clients
2014 – 2015 1,464
2015 – 2016 1,129
2016 – 2017 1,259
2017 – 2018 1,453
2018 – 2019 999
Total 6,304 Of which unique across whole cohort

This has been filtered for those clients who are aged 18-64 with an LD primary support reason. We have then picked up Eligible Needs based on the outcome of the assessment. The drop in numbers could be because of the introduction of a new process which means that some client needs are signposted elsewhere to support their needs.

5. Of the adults identified in questions 4(a) to 4(e) how many were not having all of their eligible needs met after:
a. 6 weeks
b. 12 weeks
c. 24 weeks

Financial Year < six weeks 6-11 weeks 12 – 23 weeks >24 weeks Total of which unique in financial year
2014 – 2015 1,284 425 348 169 2,226 1464
2015 – 2016 909 409 355 156 1,829 1129
2016 – 2017 752 404 446 357 1,959 1259
2017 – 2018 807 451 473 385 2,116 1453
2018 – 2019 487 285 231 165 1,168 999
Total 4,239 1,974 1,853 1,232 9,298
Of which unique across whole date range 2287 1431 1376 1005 2707

This has been filtered for those clients who are aged 18-64 with an LD primary support reason. The question has missed the majority of these clients who are assessed and have their care services in place in under 6 weeks. This represents the majority of our service users (84.5% are assessed and have services set up under six weeks). This data is showing the difference between the start date of the assessment form and the end date of the care plan (where it exists).

6. In 2018/19, how many working-age adults (aged 18-64) with a learning disability had an assessment for adult social care which resulted in no services being provided?

Financial Year Number of unique clients
2014 – 2015 115
2015 – 2016 112
2016 – 2017 109
2017 – 2018 142
2018 – 2019 105
Total 583 ( of which 483 unique across whole cohort)

This has been filtered for those clients who are aged 18-64 years old with an LD primary support reason. Where their assessment was ended within the financial year and the outcome was No Eligible Needs (excl. Abandon to make this different from Q1).

If data is not available for 2018/19, please supply the information for the most recent year that data is available for. Please exclude those who received no services for the reason ‘deceased’.