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Adult Social Care Results Summary

National Adult Social Care Survey report: Personal Social Services Adult Social Care Survey – NHS Digital 

 

National Adult Social Care Survey Power BI dashboard: Microsoft Power BI 

 

The Adult Social Care Survey is an annual national survey and covers all service users aged 18 and over in receipt, at the point that data are extracted, of long-term support services funded or managed by social services following a full assessment of need. It seeks to learn more about how effectively services are helping service users to live safely and independently in their own homes, and the impact that these services have on their quality of life. 

 

User experience information is critical for understanding the impact of services, for enabling choice and for informing service development. Data from this survey enables councils to benchmark against their peers and to gather information to support their local commissioning, performance and strategy. The survey also supplies data for a number of measures in the Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework. 

 

Due to the impact of coronavirus (COVID-19), the 2020-21 survey was voluntary and Councils with Adult Social Services Responsibilities (CASSRs) could choose whether or not to participate. 18 CASSRs took part in the survey. 

 

2017-18 survey fieldwork completed between 15 January 2018 and 9 March 2018. 1,287 surveys were issued and 521 were returned (41% response rate). 

 

2018-19 survey fieldwork completed between 14 January 2019 and 8 March 2019. 1,260 surveys were issued and 533 were returned (42% response rate). 

 

2019-20 survey fieldwork were returned between 13 January 2020 and 13 March 2020. 1,335 surveys were issued and 495 were returned (37% response rate). 

 

2021-22 survey fieldwork were returned between 10 January 2022 and 11 March 2022. 1,332 surveys were issued and 473 were returned (36% response rate). 

 

 

The survey responses feed into the Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework (ASCOF) with 5 national indicators covering: 

 

1A – Social care-related quality of life score 

1B – Proportion of people who use services who have control over their daily life 

1I1 – Proportion of people who use services who reported that they had as much social contact as they would like 

1J – Adjusted social care-related quality of life – impact of Adult Social Care services 

3A – Overall satisfaction of people who use services with their care and support 

3D1 – Proportion of people who use services who find it easy to find information about support 

4A – Proportion of people who use services who feel safe 

4B – Proportion of people who use services who say that those services have made them feel safe and secure 

 

 

 

1A – Social care-related quality of life score 

 

This measure is an average quality of life score.  It is a composite measure using responses to survey questions covering the eight domains identified in the ASCOF; control, dignity, personal care, food and nutrition, safety, occupation, social participation and accommodation.  Any respondents who failed to answer all of the questions are excluded from the calculation.  The maximum possible score is 24. 

 

  2017-18  2018-19  2019-20  2021-22 
Outcome  19.0  19.1  19.2  19.6 
Rank out of 150 Local Authorities  86th  75th  71st  5th 
Quartile  3rd  2nd  2nd  1st 

 

1B – Proportion of people who use services who have control over their daily life 

 

A key objective of the drive to make care and support more personalised is that support more closely matches the needs and wishes of the individual, putting users of services in control of their care and support. Therefore, asking users of care and support about the extent to which they feel in control of their daily lives is one means of measuring whether this outcome is being achieved. 

 

  2017-18  2018-19  2019-20  2021-22 
Outcome  75.7%  78.7%  78.7%  82.8% 
Rank out of 150 Local Authorities  107th  67th  59th  8th 
Quartile  3rd  2nd  2nd  1st 

 

1I1 – Proportion of people who use services who reported that they had as much social contact as they would like 

 

There is a clear link between loneliness and poor mental and physical health. A key element of the Government’s vision for social care is to tackle loneliness and social isolation, supporting people to remain connected to their communities and to develop and maintain connections to their friends and family. This measure will draw on self-reported levels of social contact as an indicator of social isolation for users of social care. 

 

  2017-18  2018-19  2019-20  2021-22 
Outcome  42.8%  44.7%  45.8%  45.5% 
Rank out of 150 Local Authorities  111th  92nd  82nd  18th 
Quartile  3rd  3rd  3rd  1st 

 

 

3A – Overall satisfaction of people who use services with their care and support 

 

This measures the satisfaction with services of people using adult social care, which is directly linked to a positive experience of care and support. Analysis of surveys suggests that reported satisfaction with services is a good predictor of people’s overall experience of services. 

 

  2017-18  2018-19  2019-20  2021-22 
Outcome  67.9%  70.7%  67.5%  68.7% 
Rank out of 150 Local Authorities  35th  11th  42nd  15th 
Quartile  1st  1st  2nd  1st 

 

3D1 – Proportion of people who use services who find it easy to find information about support 

 

This measure reflects social services users’ experience of access to information and advice about social care in the past year. Information is a core universal service and a key factor in early intervention and reducing dependency. Improved and/or more information benefits people by helping them to have greater choice and control over their lives. These benefits accrue only where information is accessed that would not otherwise have been accessed, or in those cases where the same information is obtained more easily. 

 

  2017-18  2018-19  2019-20  2021-22 
Outcome  69.9%  65.6%  64.4%  66.9% 
Rank out of 150 Local Authorities  116th  121st  118th  55th 
Quartile  4th  4th  4th  2nd 

 

4A – Proportion of people who use services who feel safe 

 

Safety is fundamental to the wellbeing and independence of people using social care, and the wider population. Feeling safe is a vital part of users’ experience and their care and support.  There are legal requirements about safety in the context of service quality, including CQC essential standards for registered services. 

 

  2017-18  2018-19  2019-20  2021-22 
Outcome  68.8%  70.6%  66.0%  70.7% 
Rank out of 150 Local Authorities  94th  70th  120th  60th 
Quartile  3rd  2nd  4th  2nd 

 

4B – Proportion of people who use services who say that those services have made them feel safe and secure 

 

This measure supports measure 4A by reflecting the extent to which users of care services feel that their care and support has contributed to making them feel safe and secure. As such, it goes some way to separate the role of care and support in helping people to feel safe from the influence of other factors, such as crime levels and socio-economic factors. 

 

  2017-18  2018-19  2019-20  2021-22 
Outcome  80.8%  82.8%  87.3%  88.5% 
Rank out of 150 Local Authorities  126th  120th  71st  45th 
Quartile  4th  4th  2nd  2nd