New SEN Information Report guidance

Babcock LDP has published new Guidance for writing an SEN Information Report (February 2019). 

The Special Educational Needs and Disability Code of Practice (2015) says that every school must publish an SEN Information report on its website. This report should be kept up to date with significant changes and published annually each September.

If you have an SEN Policy do you need an SEN Information Report?

The SEN Information Report is different from the SEN Policy. The SEN Policy details the school’s ethos and approach to SEN whereas the SEN information report describes what has happened and how the policy has been implemented in the last academic year.

Who is the SEN Information Report for?

The primary audience for the report is parents and carers. It is important to ensure the language used within the report is written in plain English. Best practice would be to involve and consult parents in the drawing up and review of the report. It is advised the report is published using a Dyslexia-friendly ‘sans serif’ font such as Arial, Comic Sans, Century Gothic, Verdana, Trebuchet or Calibri.

What’s in an SEN Information Report?

The SEN Information report must contain:

• the kinds of SEN that are provided for
• policies for identifying children and young people with SEN and assessing their needs, including the name and contact details of the SENCO (mainstream schools)
• arrangements for consulting parents of children with SEN and involving them in their child’s education
• arrangements for consulting young people with SEN and involving them in their education
• arrangements for assessing and reviewing children and young people’s progress towards outcomes. This should include the opportunities available to work with parents and young people as part of this assessment and review
• arrangements for supporting children and young people in moving between phases of education and in preparing for adulthood. As young people prepare for adulthood outcomes should reflect their ambitions, which could include higher education, employment, independent living and participation in society
• the approach to teaching children and young people with SEN
• how adaptations are made to the curriculum and the learning environment of children and young people with SEN
• the expertise and training of staff to support children and young people with SEN, including how specialist expertise will be secured
• evaluating the effectiveness of the provision made for children and young people with SEN
• how children and young people with SEN are enabled to engage in activities available with children and young people in the school who do not have SEN
• support for improving emotional and social development. This should include extra pastoral support arrangements for listening to the views of children and young people with SEN and measures to prevent bullying
• how the school involves other bodies, including health and social care bodies, local authority support services and voluntary sector organisations, in meeting children and young people’s SEN and supporting their families
• arrangements for handling complaints from parents of children with SEN about the provision made at the school

The guidance is designed to help schools to decide what information to include in the report. It is not an exhaustive list of information but a suggestion of the types of information schools may wish to include.